Monthly Archives: May 2013

Migrating to Cloud VPS Hosting. What to do with email?

I’ve started looking moving the sites I’m hosting on a Hostgator reseller account to a Digital Ocean cloud VPS. I’ve already moved over my personal sites to a the base $5 VPS. The lone issue is what to do with the one client I have who uses their domain’s email thru Hostgator (as well as future clients). I set up all of my other clients (including myself) with Google Apps email for their domains prior to Google no longer offering a free version.

I’ve never set up or maintained mail servers before, so I’m not excited about the prospect of doing that now, as critical as email is for most businesses. I wish there were cloud hosting services that could spin up a small VPS just for email after entering a domain name and making a few DNS updates. Maybe there are and I just haven’t found them yet.

I could just maintain a Hostgator account that only handles email for multiple domains, but seems a bit klugy.

Thoughts on Vagrant

I’ve been making a play to get current and stay current with today’s web dev technologies, trends, etc.

It’s not easy. Things are moving fast and I was a bit behind to begin with.

Some of the tools that developers on the cutting edge are pushing appear to be a little abstract relative to what I’m actually working on right now or to my current workflow. One of these tools is Vagrant. Don’t worry, I do get it. Dev environments should match Prod and Vagrant makes it much easier to accomplish. But as a single developer who doesn’t need new environments that often, do I really want to spend time learning about Vagrant, along with Chef and/or Puppet just to prop up the occasional new environment when my current OS X/MAMP Pro dev environment really hasn’t caused me any problems to date? (actually, I did have an issue with case-sensitivity and class names, but not a big deal.)

Again, my use-case is currently limited (single developer, very few new environments, content with MAMP). And I don’t really want to take the time right now to learn Chef or Puppet. But if I can make it super simple, and considering the prospect of developing an app and packaging it up with a Vagrantfile and including it in a repo – all ready to go (I haven’t really seen this, but it sounds cool), then maybe it’s worth looking into. Plus, I’ll have that peace of mind that my Dev and Prod environments are matched.

So I borrowed some code from a couple of different Vagrant/Laravel 4 Github repos and mashed together my own Vagrantfile/boostrap.sh that is very simple and doesn’t require Puppet or Chef to get something up and running that to run a Laravel app. In addition to installing a LAMP environment, it points the default Apache site to the public folder.

Your web app will be available at http::/localhost:8888 and you can access MySQL via an SSH tunnel using the “vagrant” user.

Posted on Github: https://github.com/rufhausen/super-simple-vagrant-laravel