“Essential” Sublime Text 3 Plugins

Everyone likes to publish their favorite or “essential” Sublime Text plugins, so I’m joining the party.

These are all Sublime Text 3-compatible plugins. I have a number of other plugins installed, but these are the only ones that I would immediately miss if I did a fresh install of ST3 (along with the Ubuntu Mono font).

  1. Alignment
    Makes your code like pretty and more readable by lining up selections based on “=” “=>”, etc. Great for arrays.
  2. GitGutter
    Unobtrusive display of uncommitted changes in the gutter (next to line numbers).
  3. Trailing Spaces
    Highlights and trims unused whitespace at the end of lines.
  4. SideBarEnhancements
    Gives you way more options for dealing with files in the sidebar. I just wish I could figure out how to delete a file with shift+delete.
  5. SublimeLinter
    Highlights errors in your code as you type.
  6. Laravel Blade Highlighter
    Provides color-coding for Laravel’s blade templates.

I’ve really wanted to like other editors, and there appears to be a big push toward PHPStorm in the Laravel community right now, but ST3 is just too fast, too pretty, and too customizable for me to change.

2014-02-22 at 11.22 AM

A few Laravel 4.1 Update Gotchas

Update (12/12/1013): One of the headaches with the upgrade to Production was waiting for ‘composer update’ to run while the site was down due to the skeleton and framework being out of sync. However, I’ve just realized that I should be pushing my composer.lock file to prod and just running ‘composer install’, which is much faster and makes sure your packages are in sync across environments. Doh!

I have a bad habit of being an early adopter. Mavericks? Sign me up! New iPhone, I’m there!

So when Laravel 4.1 was release a few hours ago, I had to jump in and update some apps. Upgradeing frameworks will probably never be as easy as upgrading WordPress, et al., but the changes to the Laravel app skeleton are pretty minor. However, once that’s done, there are few things to watch out for:

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Moving to VPS hosting and dealing with email, Part 2

A while back I wrote a post about the dilemma of moving away from shared hosting to VPS (unmanaged) hosting and dealing with domain-specific email addresses.

I’ve been migrating a number of web sites to a “droplet” with Digital Ocean.

There are many benefits to this:

  • Complete control over the environment – pick your own Linux distro,  db engine, web server engine, PHP version, etc.
  • Cost – For $10 on Digital Ocean, you get more RAM, CPU and storage than for most VPS servers for $30 or more.
  • Flexibility – at Digital Ocean, you can spin up new “droplets” in about a minute, using a snapshot of a current droplet if you need to scale, etc.

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Validating Route Parameters in Laravel 4 Another Way(?)

Note: as the ‘?’ indicates in the title, I’m not sure if this is the “best” way or even a “good” way. But it’s definitely a different way than Laravel’s regular expression route constraints.

I realized recently that I wasn’t doing a good job of validating the route parameters in my Laravel application in my RESTful URIs, so I started working on a solution.

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Upgrading to PHP 5.4 on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS

File this under “mostly for my own benefit”, since I often forget how I accomplished something when I need to go back and do it again.

As of March 15, 2013, PHP 5.3.x will only receive “critical fixes” and people are encouraged to upgrade to 5.4 or 5.5. And sometime in 2014, 5.3.x will not longer be supported at all. All of the Linux servers I’m working on now are running Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, which currently provides PHP 5.3.10, so I decided to look into what it takes to update to 5.4.x on these boxes.

It’s simple…
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